Autonomous taxis could greatly reduce greenhouse-gas emissions of US light-duty vehicles

Autonomous taxis could greatly reduce greenhouse-gas emissions of US light-duty vehicles

TitleAutonomous taxis could greatly reduce greenhouse-gas emissions of US light-duty vehicles
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsJeffery B Greenblatt, Samveg Saxena
JournalNature Climate Change
Volume5
Issue9
Pagination860 - 863
Date Published07/2015
ISSN1758-678X
Abstract

Autonomous vehicles (AVs) are conveyances to move passengers or freight without human intervention. AVs are potentially disruptive both technologically and socially1, 2, 3, with claimed benefits including increased safety, road utilization, driver productivity and energy savings1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Here we estimate 2014 and 2030 greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions and costs of autonomous taxis (ATs), a class of fully autonomous7, 8 shared AVs likely to gain rapid early market share, through three synergistic effects: (1) future decreases in electricity GHG emissions intensity, (2) smaller vehicle sizes resulting from trip-specific AT deployment, and (3) higher annual vehicle-miles travelled (VMT), increasing high-efficiency (especially battery-electric) vehicle cost-effectiveness. Combined, these factors could result in decreased US per-mile GHG emissions in 2030 per AT deployed of 87–94% below current conventionally driven vehicles (CDVs), and 63–82% below projected 2030 hybrid vehicles9, without including other energy-saving benefits of AVs. With these substantial GHG savings, ATs could enable GHG reductions even if total VMT, average speed and vehicle size increased substantially. Oil consumption would also be reduced by nearly 100%.

DOI10.1038/nclimate2685
LBNL Report Number

LBNL-1006310

Short TitleNature Climate Change