A Snapshot of Direct Current Microgrids and Research Around the World

A Snapshot of Direct Current Microgrids and Research Around the World

Seminar Abstract 

Direct Current (DC) distribution has recently become a hot topic in microgrids and building power distribution. It has the potential to greatly reduce the cost of electrical equipment in buildings and improve system efficiency by up to 14%. In addition, DC microgrids show potential for superior power quality, greater reliability, easier islandiblity, and combined power and data. This seminar showcases DC research across three continents in the US, Japan, and Europe. Daniel will present LBNL's recent work in DC power. His talk will span topics of the efficiency benefits of DC, the economic advantages, and how to design loads to be DC-ready. Keiichi will present NEDO's portfolio of Japanese research on DC microgrids. His talk will showcase several live demonstrations and case studies in telecom and data centers. Finally, Giel and Johan will present their DC research at KU Leuven in Belgium. Their talk will explain the advantages of bipolar DC distribution and cover several years of experiments and research in bipolar.

Seminar Speaker(s) 

Keiichi Hirose
Technical Officer, New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)

Dr. Keiichi Hirose is a Technical officer of NEDO Smart Community Department, and is engaged in solutions for mass introduction of distributed energy, effective use of storage systems, demonstration of advanced microgrid, etc., in order to solve future energy-related issues. He has contributed information and lessons obtained from his years in the telecom industry at NTT on topics including state-of-the-art technologies, mixed AC-DC power facilities, and natural disaster measurements, etc.

Johan Driesen
Professor, KU Leuven

Dr. Johan Driesen is a full professor with KU Leuven, head in EnergyVille as expert in Energy Storage. He conducts research on distributed generation, including renewable energy systems, power electronics and its applications (in drives, electric vehicles and smart grids).

Giel van den Broeck
PhD Student, KU Leuven

Giel is finalizing his PhD research at KU Leuven, Belgium. He is responsible for setting up the EnergyVille LVDC nanogrid lab for validating various LVDC network architectures, protection strategies and control algorithms. Currently, he is involved in the definition and execution phase of multiple LVDC related projects, with a focus on voltage stability and control, safety and protection.

Daniel Gerber
postdoc, Lawrence Berkeley National Labs

Daniel is a postdoctoral fellow at Lawrence Berkeley National Labs.  His specific research topics include DC power distribution and zero-standby electronics.  His general interests span power electronics, power systems, microgrids, and controls. 

Date 

Aug 8, 2019 -
12:00pm to 1:30pm

Location 

90-3122