SEMINAR: The Scout building efficiency impact analysis software: Recent developments and future improvements

SEMINAR: The Scout building efficiency impact analysis software: Recent developments and future improvements

Seminar Abstract 

This presentation provides an update on the current status and future plans for Scout, an analysis tool developed by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) for estimating the national energy savings, avoided CO2 emissions, and operating cost impact potential of energy efficient (EE) technologies in the U.S. residential and commercial building sectors. An overview of the Scout analysis approach is presented and its usefulness is demonstrated by enumeration of sample results. Current use cases for Scout within BTO are then discussed along with recent efforts to prepare the tool for use outside of BTO, including multiple stages of user testing and the parallel development of a web interface prototype. Finally, key areas for future technical improvement are discussed, with a focus on technology adoption modeling; adoption modeling is the subject of an ongoing literature review that seeks to identify viable methods for representing realistic technology diffusion dynamics as part of Scout’s impact assessments.

Seminar Speaker(s) 

Jared Langevin
Energy/Environmental Policy Research Scientist/Engineer, Simulation Research Group, Building Technology Department, Building Technology & Urban Systems Division

Jared Langevin is a Research Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he models the national impacts of building efficiency on long-term energy use and CO2 emissions, develops decision support algorithms for energy flexible building operations, and researches human-building interactions. Based in Washington, D.C., Jared was previously a Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO), where he co-created BTO’s Scout program for national building efficiency impact analysis. Jared holds a Ph.D. in Architectural Engineering from Drexel University, where his research focused on measuring and modeling the adaptive interactions between building occupants and their surrounding thermal environments, examining the links between these interactions and building energy use. Before entering into his graduate studies at Drexel, Jared received a Bachelor’s degree in Architecture from Carnegie Mellon University.

Date 

Jun 22, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location 

90-3122

Host